Shaun Marcum's tenure with the Mets has come to an unceremonious ending with his release yesterday. (Image Credit: Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports)

New York Mets to Release Shaun Marcum


When the New York Mets agreed to sign Shaun Marcum this past offseason they believed that he’d be able to help stabilize an uncertain starting rotation and help log innings to eliminate the wear and tear on the bullpen. That plan hasn’t gone as planned, however, as Marcum has been on the shelf since earlier this month thanks to a muscular condition in his right shoulder that led to surgery on July 15th, effectively ending his season.

According to the team, they’ve now made a move to release Marcum, a decision that will save them roughly $1 Million tied to a roster bonus in his contract. It will also open a spot on the team’s 40-man roster.

Marcum joined the Mets this past offseason on a one year, $4 Million deal which contained an additional $4 Million in potential incentives. He managed to throw just 78.1 IP before landing on the disabled list, going 1-10 with a 5.29 ERA and 1.353 WHIP.

When healthy he’s been relatively effective in his career. He holds a 3.88 ERA, 1.234 WHIP, 7.3 K/9, and 2.4 BB/9 over the course of his career, throwing 995.0 IP over eight seasons. Injuries have limited him, however, as he’s just once topped the 200 IP mark and only came close one other time. Marcum’s dealt with concerns to his knee, hip, shoulder, and neck. He also underwent Tommy John Surgery in September 2008 which cost him the entire 2009 season.

He’ll turn 32 this coming December and assuming he’s healthy another team will likely take a chance on Marcum this coming offseason. It might be a low base, high incentive deal considering his track record but he should see an opportunity somewhere to continue his career.

Tags: New York Mets Shaun Marcum

  • Joe_JP

    He was bad, but should have actually won a few more times, and it overall was a low risk that didn’t work out. Reasonable case scenario he would have been a more consistent back-end starter. Instead, Hefner was better than expected. It basically balances out in the end. And, it’s nice the Mets didn’t invest a ridiculous amount of money this time — like in the past — for these sorts of deals.