MLB Power Rankings: Week 21

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Pennant races are heating up, and pretenders and contenders are beginning to emerge in the home stretch of the 2014 season. Many changes occurred once again in this week’s MLB power rankings.

30. Colorado Rockies (46-71)

Last Week’s Record: 2-4

The Rockies’ once promising season is proving to be promising again, in a whole new fashion, as they are presently tied for the worst record in baseball, caught in the heat of the race for the #1 overall draft pick. The Rockies may very well benefit from that, to add to what is a very frail team in need of a rebuild.

29. Texas Rangers (46-71)

Last Week’s Record: 3-3

Unfortunately for the Rangers, they finish .500 for the week, which now ties them with Colorado for worst in the league. For a team that is likely struggling due to an anomaly, a first overall pick would be a monumental gain for Texas, who can utilize that to build and come off as a contender as soon as next season. This season, however, should involve tanking to get that pick.

28. Houston Astros (49-69)

Last Week’s Record: 2-4

Not the best week for the Astros, who stay near the bottom of the league, and haven’t shown much promise for too much change next year, despite the powerful farm system. Progress from younger players should continue to be the focus for Houston from here on out.

27. Arizona Diamondbacks (51-67)

Last Week’s Record: 2-4

The D-Backs were swept by the Royals, but then took two of three from the lowly Rockies, ending their week in a decent fashion. The D-Backs should at least consider an Archie Bradley call-up, as getting the TOR starter of the future some time in the big leagues does no harm for an already struggling team.

26. Chicago Cubs (50-66)

Last Week’s Record: 3-3

Aug 5, 2014; Denver, CO, USA; Chicago Cubs second baseman Javier Baez (9) watches his game winning home run ball as he runs the bases during the twelfth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. The Cubs won 6-5. Mandatory Credit: Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

A decent week for the Cubs, who have been high off of the buzz of the arrival of top prospect Javier Baez (right), who has contributed with 3 HR and 6 RBI in his first week as a Cub. The Cubs will look to end 2014 on a strong note, and with the arrival of more prospects imminent, the future is here for the Chicago Cubs.

25. Boston Red Sox (52-65)

Last Week’s Record: 3-3

Another mediocre week for the Red Sox, who did make some noise late, winning a series over the Angels in Anaheim, making quite the statement and showing the potential to be a significant playoff spoiler later in the season.

24. Minnesota Twins (52-64)

Last Week’s Record: 2-4

Rough week for Minnesota, but the contributions from the young stars continue to flow in. The Twins may debate calling up the top prospect in baseball, Byron Buxton for a taste of the big leagues in September, but it is far from certain that it will happen.

23. Philadelphia Phillies (53-65)

Last Week’s Record: 4-2

The Phillies continue to distance themselves from the bottom, which isn’t working in their favor, as with an aging core of players, it will be difficult for the Phils to extend success beyond this year. With a weak farm system, this year may be the last taste of mediocrity for Phillies fans.

22. San Diego Padres (54-62)

Last Week’s Record: 3-2

The Pads pull off an above average week, and continue to prove that a few good hitters can right the ship for a team that possesses a strong pitching staff. The Padres will need to make moves in that fashion, and experimenting in the rest of 2014 does no harm for the future.

21. Chicago White Sox (56-63)

Last Week’s Record: 2-5

A bad week for the ChiSox, who may now regret not selling off any pieces at the deadline. With a considerably light farm system, not trading for any prospects can hurt the long term future of this team, and there isn’t much to cheer for regardless on the South Side as it is right now.

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