Miami Marlins Top Ten Prospects For 2017

Jul 22, 2015; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Detailed view of the Miami Marlins logo on a batting helmet in the dugout against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports
Jul 22, 2015; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Detailed view of the Miami Marlins logo on a batting helmet in the dugout against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports /
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4. Luis Castillo, RHP

Birthdate: 12/12/92 (23 years old)
Level(s) Played in 2016: high A, AA
Stats in 2016: 131 2/3 IP, 2.26 ERA, 1.00 WHIP, 4.81 BB%, 19.81 K%

Castillo was acquired from the Giants by the Marlins in the Casey McGehee deal, and he was nearly shipped out in the Colin Rea fiasco with the Padres this summer, so he’s been bounced around a bit.

Castillo’s stuff, while raw, isn’t the type that you’d think to bounce around the way it has. He has a fastball that clears triple digits with ease and sits in the 94-96 range consistently.

Castillo’s stuff, while raw, isn’t the type that you’d think to bounce around the way it has

He throws his slider like a power sinker, getting heavy late action on the pitch with a higher velocity than your average slider when he’s got a good feel for it. When he’s working both, he’s got a legitimate plus fastball and slider.

His change has been a work in progress, but he made big strides with at least sequencing the pitch this season, using it well against same-handed and opposite-handed hitters.

He does have much more control than command right now, but his stuff all works low in the zone, and creates a lot of weak contact, generally missing the barrel and allowing for him to have tremendous success with lower strikeout rates.

He profiles as a mid-rotation starter that should likely start 2017 in the upper minors, whether AA or AAA, and could see time in Miami this season.

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