Miami Marlins Mount Rushmore

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 25: Flowers, a hat and the number of Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez is shown on the pitching mound at Marlins Park on September 25, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Fernandez died in a boating accident. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 25: Flowers, a hat and the number of Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez is shown on the pitching mound at Marlins Park on September 25, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Fernandez died in a boating accident. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images) /
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Dontrelle Willis (2003-2007)

One of the brightest young stars in baseball, Dontrelle Willis appeared to be an emerging ace.

He burst on the scene with the Marlins, joining the team in the middle of April. His unique delivery and upbeat attitude made him an instant fan favorite, as he became a surprising factor in Florida’s push for the postseason. He made the All Star Game that year, and won the Rookie of the Year award. After a down year in 2004, Willis led the National League with 22 wins, made his second All Star Game, and finished second in the Cy Young vote.

Just when he appeared to have a bright future, something happened. Willis was not as effective the following season, and began to struggle with his command. After a mediocre 2007 campaign, he was included in the infamous Miguel Cabrera trade, sent to the Tigers. However, he never rediscovered that early magic, winning only four games in the next four years as he bounced around the league.

Overall, during his time with the Marlins, Willis was a solid pitcher. While he had his peaks and valleys, he posted a solid 68-54 record with a 3.78 ERA and a 1.359 WHiP. In his 1022.2 innings, he struck out 757 batters with 344 walks. He may not have been the dominant force from his rookie year, but he was a decent piece of the Marlins rotation.

Dontrelle Willis streaked across the sky like a comet. Unfortunately, he burned out just as quickly.