MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the ballot

COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 27: Baseball fans await the start of the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony at Clark Sports Center during on July 27, 2014 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 27: Baseball fans await the start of the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony at Clark Sports Center during on July 27, 2014 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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Curt Schilling – Sixth Year on Ballot (45.0% in 2017)

It seemed as though Curt Schilling was on his way to the MLB Hall of Fame. Then, he had to open his mouth.

A late bloomer, Schilling had an excellent second half to his career. However, after his retirement, he has remained in the public eye for less than stellar reasons. His gaming company went bankrupt, costing Rhode Island taxpayers $28.7 Million. Schilling made controversial social media posts that led to his being fired from ESPN, and ultimately cost him 7.3% of the vote from 2016 to 2017.

Based on his statistics, Schilling is a borderline Hall of Famer. A six time All Star and former World Series MVP, he posted a lifetime 216-146 record, along with a 3.46 ERA and a 1.137 WHiP. In his 3261 innings, Schilling struck out 3116 batters against 711 walks. On the diamond, Schilling was as good as any pitcher of his era during his peak.

If the vote only covered his on the field exploits, Schilling would probably be enshrined. His performance during the 2004 postseason, with his bloody sock, would have been enough to push him over the edge. However, for Schilling, his story does not end with his sailing off into the sunset after his career came to a close.

Curt Schilling lost votes last year due to his actions. While he may be a strong candidate, it may take some time before he regains that lost ground.