MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2019 ballot

COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: Seats are seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: Seats are seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
(Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images) /

Michael Young – 1st year on ballot

One of the greatest players in Rangers history, Michael Young has an intriguing case for the MLB Hall of Fame.

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A valuable piece for Texas, Young moved all around the diamond. He spent primarily time at second, third, and short, with over 400 games at each position. While he was not exactly a great defensive player, despite winning a Gold Glove at short, Young was able to make those plays he could get to, which allowed the Rangers to keep his bat in the lineup.

That bat proved to be a formidable weapon. Young was a seven time All Star, winning the 2005 batting title. Young had a lifetime .300/.346/.441 batting line, hitting 440 doubles and 185 homers. He had six seasons with over 200 hits, leading the AL twice.

All in all, Young was a solid, versatile piece for the Rangers. As they were in the midst of the run of consecutive World Series appearances, he was a key part of the lineup, helping bring the Rangers so very close to a championship in 2011. He played one more year, split between the Phillies and the Dodgers, before retiring at the end of the 2013 campaign, despite interest from several teams that wanted to sign him.

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Michael Young was a solid player for the Rangers, with a decent enough case for the MLB Hall of Fame. Yet, as strong as his numbers may be, he did not play long enough to warrant serious consideration.