MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2019 ballot

COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: Seats are seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: Seats are seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
(Photo by John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images) /

Jon Garland – 1st year on ballot

A solid pitcher throughout his career, Jon Garland was virtually the definition of a .500 pitcher, aside from two relatively decent years.

He found success in 2005 and 2006, his improvement coinciding with the White Sox own surge in the standings. Garland was an All Star in 2005, a surprise 18 game winner who finished sixth in the Cy Young vote. He won another 18 games in 2006, although with less success, before settling back in as a basically average back of the rotation arm.

During the course of his career, Garland posted a 136-125 record, along with a 4.35 ERA and a 1.387 WHiP. Never a strikeout pitcher, he struck out 1156 batters in his 2151.2 innings, issuing 723 walks. Garland was what he was – a back of the rotation starter who had two good seasons.

Being a steady arm who can generate outs and throw 200 or more innings a year can be a great career path. Garland, despite his modest numbers, was able to carve out a 13 year career before shoulder surgery in 2011 sapped his ability and essentially ended his career.

Jon Garland was a solid pitcher. He just was not a Hall of Fame caliber one.