New York Mets: Should the Mets Acquire Robinson Cano?

ARLINGTON, TX - SEPTEMBER 22: Robinson Cano #22 of the Seattle Mariners hits a three-run home run in the fourth inning against the Texas Rangers at Globe Life Park in Arlington on September 22, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TX - SEPTEMBER 22: Robinson Cano #22 of the Seattle Mariners hits a three-run home run in the fourth inning against the Texas Rangers at Globe Life Park in Arlington on September 22, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) /
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The Seattle Mariners are actively shopping Robinson Cano, should the New York Mets be interested? Is the embattled former All-Star a good fit for the club?

The New York Mets are looking to be aggressive in their attempts to improve their roster, could they trade for an impact bat? According to Ken Rosenthal of the Athletic (via Metsblog.com), the Seattle Mainers have reached out to the New York Mets in regards to a possible trade centered around their aging All-Star, Robinson Cano. Would this be a good deal for the club?

The possibility is intriguing. The Mets do not have significant salary committed to assets past 2020 and the Mariners would likely retain a portion of Cano’s mammoth salary. The cherry on top would be that the Mariners would need to include a top prospect in a potential deal. This last aspect could entice the Mets as they are looking to acquire meaningful talent.

While acquiring a top prospect would be nice, I feel that the Mets should not spend money just because they have the flexibility. The embattled Cano is still a productive player and we could acquire him at a discount, but he is not a good fit for the New York Mets.

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The 36-year old Cano has 5 years and $120 million left on his current deal. The Mets can’t offer him a role as their designated hitter, first base is already backlogged as Peter Alonso awaits his chance to debut, and all signs point to Jeff McNeil retaining his role as the club’s second baseman.

Mickey Callaway and Co. could get creative, maybe by moving McNeil to third base and installing him in a platoon with Todd Fraizer, but when it comes down to it, we cannot ignore Cano’s age. At this point in his career, Robinson Cano is better suited as a member of an American League club where he can DH and occasionally play the field. His fielding may not be an issue now, but it could become one as he continues to age.

The Mets have the beginnings of a nice young core. There is a route to contention while keeping Alonso, McNeil, Amed Rosario, Brandon Nimmo, and Michael Conforto together. The team needs to build up their roster around their current assets, acquiring Cano would only create a roadblock for another young player.

dark. Next. Potential trade options for Mets

Acquiring Cano would be a “classic Mets” move. If they traded for him, the club would be stuck with an aging former All-Star until he turns 41-years-old. Brodie Van Wagenen wants to change the culture around the Mets, acquiring Cano would only further the Mets’ reputation of being a badly managed club playing in the countries biggest market. The New York Mets should stay away, as their time, assets and roster spots can be used in better ways.