MLB Contracts: The worst contract on every team

BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 29: Chris Davis #19 of the Baltimore Orioles reacts after striking out looking for the third out of the first inning against the Washington Nationals at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on May 29, 2018 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 29: Chris Davis #19 of the Baltimore Orioles reacts after striking out looking for the third out of the first inning against the Washington Nationals at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on May 29, 2018 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images) /
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TORONTO, ON – JULY 28: Troy Tulowwitzki #2 of the Toronto Blue Jays is helped off the field by trainers George Poulis and Mike Frostad after injuring his ankle in the third inning during MLB game action against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Rogers Centre on July 28, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images) /

11. Toronto Blue Jays

Troy Tulowitzki, 7 years, $134 million, 2014-20. Paul Cohen

The Blue Jays acquired Tulowitzki just prior to the 2015 trading deadline. They were a playoff contender that won the AL East before eventually losing the ALCS in six games to Kansas City, and they needed a shortstop with punch.

At the time, that neatly described Tulowitzki, a career .300 hitter with 188 home runs to his credit. But the remarriage never worked. When Tulowitzki left Colorado he was batting .300; he hit .239 in Toronto and .205 in post-season.

He fell to .254 in 2016, to .240 in an injury-riddled 2017, and he missed all of 2018 with back issues, the Jays paying $20 million for his idleness. To date he has earned $80 million in Toronto while averaging fewer than 250 plate appearances per season. During the three seasons he has played, his Toronto OPS+ has averaged 90, 100 being an average season.

Whether Tulowitzki will be back in 2019 is a matter of some speculation. The team’s depth chart continues to list him as the regular shortstop. But even if he does return healthy, what of it? He will be 34 on opening day; he won’t have played a game since July of 2017, and he won’t have produced a full season of production since 2016.

Absent an act of God, the only thing certain to continue is Tulowitzki’s income. The Jays owe him $34 million through 2020 with a $15 million team option for 2021 that Toronto cannot wait to decline.