Chicago White Sox: The 2010s All-Decade team

CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 29: Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox look on against the Detroit Tigers on September 29, 2019 at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 29: Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox look on against the Detroit Tigers on September 29, 2019 at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /
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(Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)
(Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images) /

All-Decade Chicago White Sox

Melky Cabrera, Left Field

  • Years: 2015-2017
  • HR: 43
  • OPS+: 107.33

The decision comes down to Cabrera or Leury Garcia, who has gravitated in and out of the position since 2014. Cabrera only played three seasons, but they were good ones. He hit .288, averaging 13 home runs and 73 RBIs with a 107.33 average OPS+. That’s far superior to Garcia’s 76 OPS+.


Adam Eaton, Center Field

  • Years: 2014-2016
  • HR: 29
  • OPS+: 119.67

This is a three-way battle pitting Eaton against Adam Engel and Alex Rios. With three seasons each in center, Eaton and Engel both have the positional edge on Rios, whose four years in Chicago included only two in center. (He’ll also be considered in right.) Engel is hurt by his part-time status, and also by his sub-par production.

That leaves it to Eaton, who before being traded to Washington averaged .290 for the Sox with solid defense, 50 RBIs and a 119.67 OPS+.


Alex Rios, Right field

  • Years: 2010-2013
  • HR: 71OPS+: 100.5

Again, this is a two-way contest, Rios vs. Avisail Garcia. Garcia played longer in right field, and their OPS+ numbers in Chicago – 104.17 for Garcia, 100.50 for Rios – demonstrate their productive similarity.

So the decision comes down to power. In his four years. Rios averaged 17.75 home runs and 69.5 RBIs, both better than Garcia’s 12.33 and 48.17. Rios also averaged about 260 more plate appearances per season than Garcia, who really only played 2.5 seasons as a regular.