Cincinnati Reds: The 2010s All-Decade Team

MIAMI, FLORIDA - AUGUST 27: Joey Votto #19 of the Cincinnati Reds in action against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - AUGUST 27: Joey Votto #19 of the Cincinnati Reds in action against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images) /

All-Decade Cincinnati Reds Outfield

Adam Duvall, Left Field

  • Years: 2015-2018

The Reds have always like left fielders who could slug, and they didn’t much care about other essentials like baserunning, average or fielding. That explains Adam Dunn. It also explains Duvall, who topped 30 homers in both 2016 and 2017.

But Duvall is the pick largely because his competition is so average.  Ryan Ludwick held down left from 2012 through 2014, and did peak at 26 home runs. But that 2012 season, which also included 80 RBIs and a .275 average, was it.

How about Chris Heisey? He saw part-time action from 2010 through 2014, but never topped 20 home runs and was a career .247 hitter in Cincy.

Drew Stubbs, Center Field

  • Years: 2010-2012
  • HRs: 51
  • Average OPS+: 84.6

As his 84.6 average OPS+ suggests, the case for Stubbs is weak and is best summed up in one sentence: The alternative is Billy Hamilton.

Of the two, Stubbs wins all three slash line data points. His decade batting average in Cincy was just .237, but that’s still 10 points higher than Hamilton. He had an unimpressive .309 on-base average, but Hamilton’s was .281. And his .380 slugging average, while mediocre, beats Hamilton’s .355.

With 277 stolen bases, Hamilton fared better in his specialty. But Stubbs was no slouch, stealing 40 in 2011 and 30 each in 2010 and 2012. Beyond that, Stubbs’ .813 steal success percentage actually tops Hamilton’s .775.

Jay Bruce, Right field

  • Years: 2010-2016
  • HRs: 190
  • Average OPS+: 126.8

Awards: All-Star 2011, 2012; Silver Slugger: 2012, 2013

Unless you’re a Scotty Schebler fan, Bruce is the obvious choice. He held down the position for the decade’s first six and one-half seasons, averaging 152 games between 2010 and 2015. For the first four of those seasons, he was a solid contributor, averaging 30 home runs and 94 RBIs. Out of contention in mid-season 2016, the Reds traded Bruce to the Mets for a couple of prospects who proved to be non-prospects.