MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2020 ballot

PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Corey Sipkin/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
(Photo by Corey Sipkin/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images) /

The 2020 MLB Hall of Fame ballot was announced back in November. This year has one certain first ballot Hall of Famer, and some truly interesting players.

As we wait for winter to end, and the sounds of Spring Training to start up once more, there are certain moments that we can all look forward to. One of those is the annual release of the MLB Hall of Fame ballot, a moment in time where, for the most part, one or more players will officially become a part of baseball immortality.

While some ballots have little drama, that is not the case this year. We all know that Derek Jeter will be a first ballot Hall of Famer – the only question is whether or not he joins former teammate Mariano Rivera as the only players in the history of the game to be named on every ballot. But that does not mean that there are not other interesting story lines.

Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, two players forever linked due to PED allegations, are both entering their eighth year on the ballot. Both players have been above the 50% mark, but have yet to crack 60% and really make a run at Cooperstown. Is this the year? Then there is Curt Schilling, a relatively borderline case statistically, whose post career antics and beliefs have made him suffer at the ballot. Will he get traction this time, and find his way to upstate New York?

Let us take a look at this year’s MLB Hall of Fame ballot, and check out each of the 32 players listed.