MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2020 ballot

PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
(Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images) /

Raul Ibanez – first year on ballot

Over his career, Raul Ibanez was prized not just for what he could do on the diamond, but for what he meant in the locker room.

Although it took until he was already 29 years old to get a real chance in the lineup, Ibanez still put together a solid career. He was a respected run producer with power, driving in over 100 runs four times, and posting eight seasons with 20 or more homers. As his career continued, he was a valued locker room presence, a calming veteran who was essentially an additional coach on the bench and in the lineup.

Despite that late start, Ibanez had a solid career. He was an All Star in 2009 with the Phillies, and received MVP votes three times. Ibanez produced a .272/.335/.465 batting line, hitting 424 doubles and 305 homers. Yet, that stat line does not do him justice, as he was far more valuable than the numbers would indicate.

Unfortunately, intangibles can only get a candidate so far. While Ibanez was respected throughout the game, and is seemingly bound to get a major league managerial job if he wants, he just does not have the performance needed to be enshrined in Cooperstown. At the end of the day, he was a very good player, but not at a level that will result in immortality.

Raul Ibanez may get a few votes. But it will not be enough for a second year on the MLB Hall of Fame ballot.