MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2020 ballot

PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Kathy Willen-Pool/Getty Images)
(Photo by Kathy Willen-Pool/Getty Images) /

Brad Penny – first year on ballot

At least Brad Penny can say he was on the MLB Hall of Fame ballot.

A one time top prospect for the Marlins, he was expected to form the core of the rotation along with A.J. Burnett and Josh Beckett. To a degree, the trio fulfilled expectations, as they were a key part of the 2003 World Series winning squad. Yet, Penny, like the others, never really became the pitcher he was expected to be.

He did have his moments. Penny was a two time All Star, both appearances coming with the Dodgers. In those two seasons, he led the league in wins (2005) and winning percentage (2006). Overall, he posted a lifetime 121-101 record, along with a 4.29 ERA and a 1.376 WHiP. In his 1925 innings, he struck out 1273 batters while issuing 619 walks.

Being a part of the ballot may well be his third greatest accomplishment on the diamond. Penny won two games in the 2003 World Series, and also dated known baseball player collector Alyssa Milano. As impressive as that is, those accomplishments will not help his case for induction.

At least Brad Penny can say he was on the MLB Hall of Fame ballot. He will not be there next year.