MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2020 ballot

PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - NOVEMBER 02: Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees field a ball against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game Five of the 2009 MLB World Series at Citizens Bank Park on November 2, 2009 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
(Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images) /

Curt Schilling – eighth year on ballot (60.9% in 2019)

If only Curt Schilling could shut his mouth, he might already be in the MLB Hall of Fame.

He certainly did not appear to be a viable Hall of Fame candidate over the first half of his career. Aside from two solid years with the Phillies, he appeared to be a decent starter, but nothing particularly special. Then, finally healthy once he turned 30, Schilling had a strong second portion of his career, sparking a renaissance that made him a borderline candidate.

Schilling does have a respectable resume. He was a six time All Star and finished second in the Cy Young vote three times. His performance in the 2001 World Series led to his being named the co-MVP with Randy Johnson, and he took home the 1993 NLCS MVP award as well. Overall, Schilling produced a solid 216-146 record, along with a 3.46 ERA and a 1.137 WHiP. Over his 3261 innings, Schilling struck out 3116 batters while issuing just 711 walks.

That performance, and his postseason heroics, would seemingly be enough to lead to his induction. While that may eventually be the case, Schilling’s controversial commentary when it comes to politics, the press, and LGBTQ+ issues have alienated a large portion of the voting block. However, he gained some of those votes back last year, and could get ever closer in 2020.

Curt Schilling damaged his MLB Hall of Fame candidacy with his inability to keep his mouth shut. Only time will tell if that will further damage his chances this year.