MLB History: The All Valentine’s Day team

CINCINNATI, OH - JUNE 24: Cincinnati Reds great Pete Rose is honored, along with his teammates from the 1976 World Series Championship team, prior to the start of the game between the Cincinnati Reds and the San Diego Padres at Great American Ball Park on June 24, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Kirk Irwin/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OH - JUNE 24: Cincinnati Reds great Pete Rose is honored, along with his teammates from the 1976 World Series Championship team, prior to the start of the game between the Cincinnati Reds and the San Diego Padres at Great American Ball Park on June 24, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Kirk Irwin/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by: 1974 SPX/Diamond Images via Getty Images)
(Photo by: 1974 SPX/Diamond Images via Getty Images) /

An old school feel around the infield

First base: Jimmy Hart

Jimmy Hart played only one year in the majors, appearing in 58 games for the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, the inaugural season of the American League. He performed reasonably well, producing a .311/.383/.374 batting line in his 233 plate appearances. However, he was suspended for life after he punched an umpire. That incident did not end his career, as he played in the minors through 1911.

Second base: Cupid Childs

Cupid Childs earned his nickname because of his appearance. Apparently, his 5’8″, 185 pound frame was enough for him to earn nicknames like Cupid, Fats, and Fatty. Despite his cherubic body, Childs was one of the best second basemen in the 1800s, posting a lifetime .306/.416/.389 batting line, hitting 205 doubles, 101 triples, and stealing 269 bases. Not bad for a guy called Fats.

Shortstop: Angel Berroa

For a brief moment, it seemed that Angel Berroa was going to be a star. In 2003, the former top prospect won the AL Rookie of the Year award and appeared to be a building block for the Royals. That season proved to be his best, as his time in the majors ended in 2009. All told, he compiled a .258/.303/.374 batting line, hitting 46 homers and stealing 50 bases.

Third base: Pete Rose

Let’s face it, with a name like Rose, and his resume, Pete Rose was making this team. A 17 time All Star, he won three batting titles, was named the 1963 NL Rookie of the Year, took home the 1973 NL MVP, and was a two time Gold Glove winner. He produced a lifetime .303/.375/.409 batting line, with his 4256 hits the most in major league history. Just don’t bet on his making it into the Hall of Fame during his lifetime.