Chicago Cubs: 11,000 wins, A franchise standard

CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 31: General view of the Chicago Cubs logo on the on deck circle prior to a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field on August 31, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***
CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 31: General view of the Chicago Cubs logo on the on deck circle prior to a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field on August 31, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** /
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(Photo by Mark Cunningham/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
(Photo by Mark Cunningham/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

The Atlanta Braves, a storied franchise like the Chicago Cubs, 10,713 wins.

Like the Cubs, the Braves can trace their history back to the founding of the National League in 1876. They represented Boston continuously through 1952, winning 5,118 games during the course of their residency.

In Milwaukee between 1953 and 1965, the Braves added 1,146 victories, plus the 1957 World Series title. It was the second of three in franchise history: they won in Boston in 1914 and in Atlanta in 1995.

In Atlanta, the Braves have added 4,449 victories.

The Braves have enjoyed two substantial eras of dominance: the very recent one and the very ancient one. Between their 1991 World Series appearance and today, Atlanta has collected 2,611 victories, one-quarter of the franchise total in just 20 percent of the seasons. That works out to 87 wins per year.

Five of Atlanta’s 17 pennants have come during that three-decade span, which has also encompassed 19 of the franchises’s 25 post-season appearances.

The other glory period occurred during great-grandpa’s day. During the decade of the 1890s, the Braves won five pennants and averaged 85.9 victories per season. That’s better than it sounds because schedules only lasted about 132 games in those days. Boston’s winning percentage for the decade was .621.

In fact by the start of the 1900 season, the Braves could already count 1,686 victories. 131 more than any other franchise.

The bad parts have been pretty much everything between 1900 and 1991. That was particularly the case for the long tenure in Boston. During the 1920s, the Braves averaged just 61.1 victories per season, only once winning more than 70 or finishing better than fifth. The 1930s were more of the same: 69.5 wins per season, only three seasons better than .500 and only two finishes as high as fourth.

The Milwaukee seasons brought improvement. Between 1953 and 1965, the Braves won the 1957 and 1958 pennants, lost in a playoff in 1959, and lost more than they won. The arrival of Hank Aaron virtually concurrent with the move probably had more to do with that good showing than the change of scenery.