MLB postseason: The ten best playoff MVPs

Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals. Mandatory Credit: Jim Rassol-USA TODAY Sports
Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals. Mandatory Credit: Jim Rassol-USA TODAY Sports /
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Twins pitcher Jack Morris in 1991.
Twins pitcher Jack Morris in 1991. /

1.       Jack Morris, 1.264, 1991 World Series

Morris’ work in this series played a major role in his eventual election to the Hall of Fame.

In his only season with the Twins, Morris had gone 18-12 during the regular season, making him Tom Kelly’s logical Game 1 starter. He worked seven innings, allowing five hits but just two runs and winning 5-2.

Pitching on three days rest, Morris returned in Game 4 to face Braves star John Smoltz. This time he lasted six innings, allowing just 1 run but leaving in a 1-1 tie. The Braves eventually won 3-2, squaring the series at two games each.

It was still tied, at three games each, when Morris and Smoltz met again for Game 7, each again working on three days rest. The game remains a classic.

Through seven innings, each team had moved only one runner as far as third base, neither of them scoring. A double play bailed Morris out in the bottom of the eighth. Smoltz left in the bottom of that same inning, but a Twins ninth inning rally fell short when Shane Mack grounded into a double play and Paul Sorrento whiffed.

Still pitching scoreless ball into the 10th, Morris retired Atlanta in order and hoped for some offensive support. His hopes were fulfilled when pinch hitter Gene Larkin’s deep fly got Dan Gladden across with the Series winning run.

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For the series, Morris allowed just 18 hits and three runs in 23 innings, striking out 15.