MLB Hall of Fame: Breaking down the 2021 ballot

BOSTON - OCTOBER 24: Pitcher Curt Schilling of the Boston Red Sox pitches during game two of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals at Fenway Park on October 24, 2004 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox defeated the Cardinals 6-2. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
BOSTON - OCTOBER 24: Pitcher Curt Schilling of the Boston Red Sox pitches during game two of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals at Fenway Park on October 24, 2004 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox defeated the Cardinals 6-2. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)
(Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images) /

Every year, we wonder how a player found their way on the MLB Hall of Fame ballot. Here is that section.

Michael Cuddyer – first year on ballot

Michael Cuddyer was a solid player during his 15 years in the majors. He was a two time All Star, won the 2013 NL batting title while a member of the Rockies, and had a bit of power and speed. He was a lifetime .277/.344/.461 hitter with 197 homers, 333 doubles, and 75 steals. Those were solid numbers, but Cuddyer will be lucky to even get a vote this year.

Dan Haren – first year on ballot

A solid innings eater during his time with the A’s, Dan Haren looked like he could have a case for the MLB Hall of Fame early in his career. However, his career fell off a cliff after his age 30 season, leaving him a decent career, but no chance at the hall. A three time All Star, Haren posted a 153-131 record with a 3.75 ERA and a 1.181 WHiP, striking out 2013 batters with 500 walks in 2419.1 innings. It was a solid career, but Haren is not likely to receive a vote either.

LaTroy Hawkins – first year on ballot

LaTroy Hawkins is that token middle reliever that seems to make the ballot every year. And every year, that middle reliever fails to get a vote. He spent 21 years in the majors, one of only 16 players in MLB history to appear in over 1000 games. In that time, he posted a 4.31 ERA and a 1.406 WHiP, striking out 983 batters with 456 walks over his 1467.1 innings. He did notch 127 saves and 185 holds, but is also unlikely to receive a single vote for induction.

Todd Helton – third year on ballot

Todd Helton has seen his candidacy hampered by the stigma surrounding Coors Field. However, he was a solid player in his own right – a five time All Star and three time Gold Glove winner. During the course of his career, he posted a .316/.414/.539 batting line, hitting 369 homers and 592 doubles. His candidacy has gotten more traction, as he received a 12.7% increase in the vote in 2020, but Helton has a long way to go for induction.

Tim Hudson – first year on the ballot

Tim Hudson has one of the two best cases of the first year players to remain on the ballot. A steady top of the rotation arm, Hudson was a four time All Star and the 2000 AL Cy Young runner up. He posted a 222-133 record over his career, along with a 3.49 ERA and a 1.239 WHiP, striking out 2080 batters with just 917 walks over his 3126.1 innings. While he may not be inducted into the MLB Hall of Fame, Hudson should be able to stick around on the ballot for at least one more year.