MLB history: The eclectic 300-300 club

NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
(Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

Andre Dawson

Most fans have an image of Andre Dawson hobbling around the bases on bad knees, but there was a time when he was one of the top five tool talents in the game. That was proven when he became the third member of the 300-300 club

During his time with the Expos, Dawson was a star, with five seasons where he hit at least 20 homers and stole at least 20 bases. While his speed was pretty much gone after his 11 seasons in Montreal, Dawson was still a dangerous power hitter, leading the league in homers and RBI in his first season with the Cubs.

He belted his 300th career homer in the seventh inning of the Cubs’ matchup with the Mets on April 23, 1989, taking Ron Darling to deep left center to give the Cubs a brief 2-0 lead. However, the Mets would have the last laugh, as they came back for a 4-2 victory.

Darling and the Mets factored into Dawson’s 300th steal as well. On May 23, 1991, he hit a ground ball through the hole at short for a base hit, then stole second, beating Rick Cerone’s throw. With that stolen base, Dawson became the third member of the 300-300 club, with both milestones happening at Shea Stadium.

It took nine years, but Andrew Dawson eventually received his due, being inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010, an honor that was long overdue.