MLB history: The eclectic 300-300 club

NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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(Photo by John Williamson/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
(Photo by John Williamson/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

Reggie Sanders

Reggie Sanders came the closest to missing out on this club, but he was able to just barely sneak in.

Both his 300th homer and 300th steal came in 2006 as a member of the Royals. He swiped that milestone base on April 21 in the first game of a double header against the Indians, a game where their comeback attempt was doomed by the bullpen. Sanders reached on a base hit to put runners at the corners, and after a sacrifice fly, stole second against Victor Martinez. He eventually came around to score in the Royals 6-5 loss.

The milestone homer came on June 10, another Royals defeat. With the Royals trailing 9-3 in the bottom of the ninth, Sanders took Chad Harville’s 0-1 pitch to left center for his 300th career blast. At the very least, Royals fans were able to see history made that night, as Sanders became the fifth member of the 300-300 club.

That homer also made him the most overlooked member of the fraternity. Despite a solid career, he only had one All Star appearance, and only earned MVP votes once. Sanders did not receive a vote for the Hall of Fame in 2013, being dropped off the ballot. His moment in the sun did not even last long, as the sixth member of the group joined four days later.

Reggie Sanders was overlooked for much of his career. But he was able to make history on a mediocre Royals team.