MLB history: The eclectic 300-300 club

NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1967: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 of the San Francisco Giants bats against the New York Mets during an Major League Baseball game circa 1967 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Mays played for the Giants from 1951-72. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
7 of 9
Next
(Photo by Don Smith/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
(Photo by Don Smith/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

Steve Finley

Steve Finley was the oldest player of this group to join the 300-300 club, belting his 300th homer when he was 41 years old.

His 300th steal came when he was still a member of the Diamondbacks. Finley was off to a slow start to the season when he led off the second inning on April 27, 2004. He drew a walk after an eight pitch plate appearance, then promptly stole second before coming around to score on a one out single in Arizona’s eventual 10-1 victory.

The milestone homer came just four days after Reggie Sanders became the fifth member of the 300-300 club. Finley was now a part of the Giants, his career winding down when he stepped to the plate against his former team on June 14, 2006. He led off the game against Claudio Vargas, taking his 2-2 pitch to deep right for his 300th homer, setting the tone for the Giants’ eventual 11-4 victory.

Finley was also somewhat underappreciated during his career. He was another five tool talent, overshadowed by the powerful sluggers of his era. While he was a two time All Star and a five time Gold Glove winner, he was still somewhat forgotten during his time. He received only four votes in his one year on the Hall of Fame ballot, a disappointing number for a solid player.

Another relatively anonymous member of the list, Steve Finley was a better player than most fans remember. He certainly made a mark upon the game.