MLB history: Lessons learned during the previous MLB lockout in 1990

ARLINGTON, TX - JULY 1990: MLB Commissioner Fay Vincent looks on during a July 1990 Texas Rangers game at Arlington Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by A. Kaye/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TX - JULY 1990: MLB Commissioner Fay Vincent looks on during a July 1990 Texas Rangers game at Arlington Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by A. Kaye/Getty Images) /
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Fay Vincent, MLBPA, MLB, MLB lockout
NEW YORK – CIRCA 1990: CBS broadcaster and former baseball player Tim McCarver talks with Commissioner Fay Vincent prior to the start of a Major League Baseball game circa 1990 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

In 1990, MLB owners delayed Spring Training

On February 15, though, owners announced that they would not allow Spring Training to start on time because, with the owners essentially taking most of their demands off the table, the MLBPA went for the jugular and tried to hammer down the idea of dropping arbitration from three years to two.

With negotiations stalling on that point and the player pension fund, on March 8, with Spring Training games being canceled by the day, Vincent proposed opening camps as long as the Players agreed not to strike later in the season. They turned this down.

Eventually, with the arbitration hangup between two and three years, Vincent proposed a compromise where a player would be eligible for arbitration if they had two years and 140 days of service time. This was negotiation was roughly agreed upon.

Vincent’s proposal was slightly different than what they agreed upon as they made it where the top 17 percent of players between two and three years would be eligible for arbitration, as long as they had been with the club for 86 games of the third season. This is still in place today and is commonly known as the “Super Two.”