New York Mets completely failed Matt Harvey

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 03: (NEW YORK DAILIES OUT) Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets sits in the dugout after he was removed from a game against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field on May 3, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. The Braves defeated the Mets 11-0. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 03: (NEW YORK DAILIES OUT) Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets sits in the dugout after he was removed from a game against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field on May 3, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. The Braves defeated the Mets 11-0. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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It is easy to feel sorry for Matt Harvey now. He had once been on top of the world, a budding star for the New York Mets who seemed destined to become an ace. Instead, he began to struggle, plagued by injuries and questions about his attitude as he floundered.

But there was a lot more than met the eye or had been reported. It turned out that Harvey had been struggling with mental health issues and possible drug use at the time as well, something that former Mets manager Terry Collins shared on Baseball Night in New York.

New York Mets showing how they failed Matt Harvey

One can understand how Harvey would have fallen into depression. He had been a star only to see it all crumble away. As mental health is already a topic that does not get enough attention in this country, one could see why Harvey would have tried to bottle everything inside.

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But that was not the case. He did attempt to get help, going to the Mets with his issues. And nothing happened. Nothing got better. Harvey may well have been using drugs as well, but a lot of drug use stems from mental health issues. It is a way to escape reality and get away from the mental anguish of the every day.

It appears as though the Mets have not learned anything from what happened with Harvey. At this point, they do not have any mental health professionals listed among the 21 official team doctors. While it is possible that they could refer players to a therapist or the league’s player helpline, having someone right there to talk to could make a major difference,

That could have also changed the trajectory of Harvey’s career. He may well have thrown his last pitch in the majors after his testimony as he was barely hanging on as it is. Finding help early on, when Harvey was battling those suicidal urges and mental health issues, could have made a major difference.

Then there is the interview itself. Collins should not have been airing Harvey’s mental issues for all the world to see. The fact that his suicidal ideation and suspected drug use were shared in such a callous manner without any consideration for Harvey himself speaks volumes to how the Mets failed him when he needed them most.

Chances are, Harvey is not the only player to have gone through such problems. Jeremy Giambi recently passed away due to a self-inflicted shotgun wound, but it was known during his playing days 20 years before that he was fighting battles his teammates could not imagine. This is not a new issue as well, as the likes of Donnie Moore, Willard Hershberger, and Marty Bergen, amongst many, battled their own demons without help.

It is time this changes. There are starting to be more conversations around mental health around the country, especially as people have come to realize the toll that the pandemic has taken on everyone. But those changes need to come to Major League Baseball as well. The days of failing players such as Harvey and Giambi need to come to an end.

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The New York Mets failed Matt Harvey. That was clear as former manager Terry Collins aired his mental health problems for everyone to know.