New York Yankees: Five biggest Yankee killers in MLB history

13 Jul 1998: Geronimo Berroa #29 of the Detroit Tigers in action during the game against the Kansas City Royals at Tiger Stadium in Detroit, Michigan. The Royals defeated the Tigers 6-4.
13 Jul 1998: Geronimo Berroa #29 of the Detroit Tigers in action during the game against the Kansas City Royals at Tiger Stadium in Detroit, Michigan. The Royals defeated the Tigers 6-4. /
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(Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
(Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images) /

4. Geronimo Berroa

Geronimo Berroa spent parts of 11 seasons in the majors, typically serving as a role player with some solid pop.

He did manage three 20+ homer seasons, including a career best 36 home runs for the A’s in 1996. Overall, he posted a solid .276/.349/.449 batting line in his 2825 plate appearances, hitting 101 homers and 113 doubles. He certainly had a respectable career.

Those overall numbers were nothing compared to the damage he did to the New York Yankees. Berroa feasted on their pitching, posting a stellar .328/.430/.598 batting line in his 344 plate appearances, belting 14 homers and seven doubles. He went from being a solid player to someone who looked like a superstar once the pinstripes were across the diamond.

Considering how well he performed against them, it is a surprise that the Yankees never signed Berroa. He was a part of ten different organizations, and spent time in both the Mexican League and Korean Baseball Organization, but never put on the pinstripes himself.

3. Pedro Ciriaco

Pedro Ciriaco spent parts of six seasons in the majors, suiting up for five different organizations as a utility man. He was also in the minors for four other teams and spent time in Mexico.

One could understand if he would be forgotten these days. Ciriaco posted a .268/.294/.368 batting line in his 649 plate appearances over 272 games, hitting five homers and 32 doubles while stealing 35 bases. He was considered far more valuable for his defensive versatility than for his ability with the bat.

That is, unless he was playing the New York Yankees. Ciriaco then became a superstar, posting a .407/.429/.556 batting line in 57 plate appearances, hitting six doubles as he drove in seven runs. He also stole five bases as he was a terror on the basepaths as well.

Amazingly, most of this damage came in just one year. Ciriaco had 56 plate appearances against the Yankees in 2012 and just one in the following thee years. However, he made that time count.